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Essential Resources for Geographic and Environmental Educators

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Issue Vol. 69, No. 3

Publication Date: December, 2018

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President’s Message  

Page: 2

Author(s): Geddes, Ewan

President’s Message
Ewan Geddes, Toronto District School Board

For those of you who were able to make it to the 2018 OAGEE Fall Conference, The Language of Geography, you would have had the opportunity to hear Adam Shoalts, a Royal Canadian Geographical Fellow, in his keynote talk about his solo trek across Canada’s Arctic region. He recounted his harrowing adventure and the ordeal of surviving the summer in the North. His book, Alone Against the North, details how he planned the trip by examining patterns and trends of weather and water levels, which arms of what rivers to follow, and what he might expect during the time of his adventure.

Shoalts has written another book, A History of Canada in 10 Maps. This book explores how maps changed, influenced, and dictated the direction of Canada as a nation. Whether you joined us or had to miss out on the conference, I would invite you to check out both of these books, as they can be used to connect to the concepts of geographic thinking to early explorations of Canada as well as expeditions happening even now.

At that same conference, I had the honour of bestowing OAGEE’s Award of Distinction on an individual who has contributed to the discipline of Geography above and beyond what is expected of someone in a teaching role. This year, we recognize the very well deserving Kim Wallace for all that she has done for Geography, even into her retirement.

Some highlights of Kim’s notable work include: codeveloper of Ontario’s senior Canadian and World Studies curriculum, participant in the development of the St. John’s Declaration, Advancing Geographic Education for Canadians, Fellow of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society for her outstanding contributions to geographic education at the classroom, school board, provincial, and national levels, and recipient of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society’s Louie Kamookak Medal named for Inuit historian and educator Louie Kamookak in recognition of any person who had made Canada’s geography better known to Canadians and
to the world. Kim is indeed an inspiration to us all.

While our OAGEE Spring conference 2019 in Huntsville will be smaller in scope, it will be equally interesting as it will offer great opportunities to connect with and learn from geographic and environmental educators both in workshops and on field trips in the area. Please watch our website and your emails for registration and other conference information.

This coming year also recognizes for the first time ever the OAGEE Spatial Technology Mapping Contest. Please see the Contest rules and regulations on the next  two pages.

OAGEE Spatial Technology Mapping Contest  

Page: 3-4

Author(s):

This contest is open only to residents of Canada who are teachers and are OAGEE members (excluding Quebec) and will be interpreted according to Canadian Law.

Students will create a spatial technological map using ArcGIS Desktop or ArcGIS Online to communicate a possible solution to a Geographic Issue.

Submission deadline: April 27th, 2019.

Concepts of Geographic Thinking Series - 3 - Patterns & Trends, Grades 7 & 8  

Page: 7-12

Author(s): Lowry, Mark

Grade 7: Physical Patterns in a Changing World

Overview
The activity is designed to help students understand the concept of drainage, drainage patterns, and the uses of rivers on a continental and world scale. It is also designed to address the following expectations from Strand A - Physical Patterns in a Changing World of the Ontario Ministry of Education Grade 7 Geography curriculum document. It is an example of an activity focused on Patterns and Trends - one of the four Concepts of Geographic Thinking.

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Grade 8: Strand B - Global Inequalities: Economic Development & Quality of Life

Overview
The activity is designed to help students see patterns and make connections in quality of life data. It is also designed to address the following expectations from Strand B - Global Inequalities: Economic Development and Quality of Life of the Ontario Ministry of Education Grade 8 Geography curriculum document. It is an example of an activity focused on Patterns and Trends - one of the four Concepts of Geographic Thinking.

Grade 8: Strand B - Global Inequalities: Economic
Development & Quality of Life

Overview
The activity is designed to help students see patterns and make connections in quality of life data. It is also designed to address the following expectations from Strand B - Global Inequalities: Economic Development and Quality of Life of the Ontario Ministry of Education Grade 8 Geography curriculum document. It is an example of an activity focused on Patterns and Trends - one of the four Concepts of Geographic Thinking.

GCG1P: Why Choose Canada?: Factors that Influence Immigration to Canada - Part 2  

Page: 13-22

Author(s): Williams, Emma

GCG1P: Why Choose Canada?: Factors that Influence Immigration to Canada - Part 2

Emma Williams, Pre-Service Student, Lakehead University
Editor’s Note: This is Part 2 of a two part activity. Part 1 appeared in the previous issue of The Monograph.

Mars, Ontario, and Iceland: The Unique Geography of Iceland and Its Future as a Hub of Scientific Research  

Page: 23-25

Author(s): Blumenthal, Jonathan

Standing in the center of the Bridge between Continents is an interesting experience. Your feet, only centimeters apart, are on two different continents. One lies on the North American tectonic plate, the other on the Eurasian. What makes this place more remarkable is that it grows bigger each year – the two plates are drifting apart. As slowly as this happens, it means that new crust is being formed right underneath your feet.
Meanwhile, underneath the bridge, lies the fissure. It is roughly ten meters wide, and five meters deep. Formed due to the pressure of the diverging plates, it demonstrates clearly the divide between the two plates.
As fascinating as this ridge is, the division of the two continents is only one of the many things Iceland is noted for.

CGC1 - What Size Footprint Are You Leaving on the Earth?  

Page: 26-28

Author(s): Kempster, Bethany

CGC1 - What Size Footprint Are You Leaving on the Earth?
Bethany Kempster, Teacher, Royal Ontario Museum

Activity Description
A typical Canadian’s resource consumption is far above what the Earth can sustain. One way of examining our personal impact on the environment is by measuring our ecological footprint and calculating the number of global hectares required to support our demands. This lesson plan contains activities for Grade 9 Geography students and reinforces the Interrelationships concept of geographic thinking.
After calculating their ecological footprints using an online footprint calculator, students will analyze and interpret their data, consider the importance of metaphors, and work in groups to hold a class debate on issues of responsibility and sustainability. No prior knowledge beyond basic concepts of sustainability are required for completion of these activities.

Bruce Peninsula Teacher Wins National Innovation in Geography Teaching Award  

Page: 29

Author(s): Chapman, Deborah

Bruce Peninsula Teacher Wins National Innovation in Geography Teaching Award

Deborah Chapman, Communications Manager, Royal Canadian Geographic Society

OTTAWA, ON, October 25, 2018 – While Breanna Heels was studying in East Africa, she saw the powerful role education was playing to improve people’s lives. She wanted to be part of that change and made the decision to become a teacher. Today, this K to 12 Experiential Learning Teacher at the Bluewater District School Board inspires her students to be curious about the world and how all living things on our planet are interconnected. Her goal is simply to make the world a better place for all. For her dedication and ingenuity in geographical teaching, Breanna Heels is being awarded the Royal Canadian Geographical Society’s (RCGS) highest award in teaching, its Innovation in Geography Teaching Award.

Grade 12 CGW4CU: Feeding 9 Billion - A Food Security Initiative  

Page: 30

Author(s): Arseneau, Madeleine

+ some lessons applicable to CGC Managing Resources

Madeleine Arseneau, Arrell Food Institute, University of Guelph

This six-week lesson plan aims to educate students on the issue of food security through a multidisciplinary lens. Students will gain an understanding of the political, economical, technological, and environmental factors and impacts that contribute to this global issue. The goal will be to have students engage, critically examine, and attempt to improve the global food system.
The lesson plan is easy to use and will help teachers cover varying topics, discuss specific themes and provides associated activities and external links to engage students in a fun and educational way. Over 30 activities and lessons are provided and will give students the opportunity to critically assess proposed scenarios and try to create real world solutions to solving the global food crisis. The accompanying graphic novel #FoodCrisis, card game, in class visits or webinars, and whiteboard videos provided, will be used in conjunction with the units to deliver an experiential learning experience for students and teachers.

BOOK REVIEW: #foodcrisis: A graphic novel about global food security  

Page: 31

Author(s): Robb, Joanne

BOOK REVIEW
#foodcrisis: A graphic novel about global food security
Evan D.G. Fraser (Author), Scott Mooney (Illustrator), John Perlock (Illustrator), Rocco Commisso (Illustrator)
Publisher: Lulu.com (Nov. 24 2014)
ISBN-10: 1312634928; ISBN-13: 978-1312634923
Paperback, 140 pages, $8.86 (website: lulu.com}

A colleague of mine passed this graphic novel over to me one day at work suggesting that I might be able to use it with my World Issues class. It seemed like a unique way to approach the topics of hunger and food security. The setting of the novel is the year 2025 and there are a variety of plot lines that weave through the novel.

The author, Dr Evan Fraser, professor of Geography at the University of Guelph and Fellow of the Royal Canadian Geographic Society describes the book as a futuristic cross between House of Cards and The Walking Dead.

Dr Fraser combines historical events of local or regional food crises into a dramatic setting that illustrates a possible outcome if all of these events were to happen at once. From evil politicians to Chinese stockpiling of grains to revolutionary Guatemalan farmers, the gripping novel is both entertaining and thought-provoking.

At the conclusion of the story, there is a series of 13 background essays which explain the historical context of many of the episodes of the novel. After my class had
finished reading the novel, I called our next class the book club meeting. We discussed the various storylines in the novel.

In one story line, we looked at the unravelling of Sonia, the politician’s daughter as she progressively accumulated more tattoos and body piercings as she protested police and government attempts to handle the food crisis and ultimately ended up in jail for a crime she didn’t commit.

In terms of incorporating the graphic novel into my unit, it turned out to be an easy fit. I got in contact with Dr Fraser and we had a great brainstorming session. As it so happened, he had already created a 6 week unit lined up with the Ontario curriculum in hopes that his novel would be useful in a high school setting. His website www.
feedingninebillion.com was also a great resource with a variety of short RSA animation videos which served as a great start to many lessons. Each video started with the same introduction of “Hello, my name is Evan Fraser and I work at the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada”. Consequently, my students renamed the unit “The Evan Fraser Unit” and were finally able to put a face to the voice of the videos on the final day of the unit, when Dr Fraser visited the class as a guest speaker. Conveniently it also happened to be World Food Day.

For the culminating assignment of the unit, the students had to write a food security report on the country of their choice. In their report, they were required to make reference to any portion of the novel or the background essays as they related to their chosen country’s food security situation.

Review by Joanne Robb, Region #3 Councillor